Skrevet av Emne: The caves of Altamira  (Lest 3857 ganger)

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Utlogget Rolf

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The caves of Altamira
« p: 19.01.2008 16:45 »
"Altamira (Spanish for 'high view') is a cave in Spain famous for its Upper Paleolithic cave paintings featuring drawings and polychrome rock paintings of wild mammals and human hands. It is located near the town of Santillana del Mar in Cantabria, Spain, 30 km west of the city of Santander. The cave with its paintings has been declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO."
More:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Altamira_(cave)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wtDRA5emVqo
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HmD6Lo9-l3s&feature=related


And even music:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EsiG6WiHHPQ&feature=related
"When I try to imagine a faultless love
Or the life to come, what I hear is the murmur
Of underground streams, what I see is a limestone landscape."
W.H. Auden, "In Praise of Limestone"

Utlogget Narve

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Sv: The caves of Altamira
« Svar #1 p: 30.10.2008 22:58 »

 

"After Altamira, all is decadence".
Look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better.
- Albert Einstein -

Utlogget Rolf

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Sv: The caves of Altamira
« Svar #2 p: 31.10.2008 00:44 »
"30,000 years of modern art
Monet and Picasso get the credit for ending art's obsession with realism and classical beauty. But they had some powerful allies - the cave painters of the stone age. Jonathan Jones reports"
(...)
"The bison looks back at its killer accusingly, its body flattened on the ground, its head twisted violently. Potently engraved on a piece of stone during the late ice age more than 12,000 years ago and discovered in 19th-century France, it is now on view in Prehistory: Objects of Power, a permanent display at the British Museum, a place to confront the astounding age of human culture.

The oldest artefacts in the exhibition, chopping tools from Tanzania, are almost two million years old. A hand axe found in Sussex in 1797 and recognised then as something very early is much more ancient than its discoverer could have imagined, living in an age when the biblical account of creation was just beginning to be doubted. It is thought to have been made 400,000 years ago.

As technology, these objects created by early humans are impressive. As works of art, they are daunting, mind-fuddling. Very early in the development of technology, something astonishing happens. Axe heads take on features that cannot be purely practical. Beautiful, glittering rock crystal is selected, then chipped into a symmetrical, visually satisfying shape. Although the British Museum's Prehistory display more or less avoids the word "art", it shows the difficulty of telling where use ends and aesthetic power begins in the earliest human cultures."

More:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2002/jun/15/artsfeatures
"When I try to imagine a faultless love
Or the life to come, what I hear is the murmur
Of underground streams, what I see is a limestone landscape."
W.H. Auden, "In Praise of Limestone"