Skrevet av Emne: 'No Place On Earth' is a fascinating tale of survival  (Lest 822 ganger)

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Utlogget Rolf

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"In 1993, American spelunker Chris Nicola was exploring caves in the Ukraine when he came upon an astonishing discovery. Nicola found rusted lamps, old buttons, shoes and wall markings that indicated that human beings had lived below ground sometime in the past 50 years.

The locals in the neighboring village were not to keen to discuss Nicola’s findings. So Nicola, who worked as an investigator at his day job in New York City, began doing some digging about the cave people.

He soon discovered that, during the Nazi reign of terror in Europe, nearly 40 Jewish men, women and children crawled into the ironically named Priest’s Grotto Cave and survived in the dark until the Germans were defeated.

It was not an easy feat. The dangers, ordeals and close-calls are all cataloged by the survivors and through dramatic re-creations of those dark days in the truly fascinating, but slightly flawed, docu-drama “No Place On Earth.” It is being shown this weekend at the All Saints Cinema by the Tallahassee Film Society as part of its Jewish Film Series.

The Film Society shows a lot of movies about the Holocaust so it is possible to develop a strange case of Holocaust Fatigue if you follow every one of the harrowing, downbeat stories. “No Place On Earth” is different because it is so personal and such an unbelievable tale of human endurance that it grabs the viewer from the get-go."

More:

http://www.tallahassee.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2013312110030&gcheck=1
"When I try to imagine a faultless love
Or the life to come, what I hear is the murmur
Of underground streams, what I see is a limestone landscape."
W.H. Auden, "In Praise of Limestone"

Utlogget Rolf

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Sv: 'No Place On Earth' is a fascinating tale of survival
« Svar #1 på: 12.12.2013 19:36 »
Jeg har sett denne filmen på britisk TV.
En fasinerende historie om hvordan disse menneskene overlevde ved å gjemme seg i to ulike grotter i over et år.

Vante grottere vet godt hvor vanskelig det kan være å oppholde seg i en grotte over lengre tid,  faren for å bli nedkjølt er stor.
Flyktningene hadde lite utstyr og holdt ut lenge fordi de simpelthen måtte det.
"When I try to imagine a faultless love
Or the life to come, what I hear is the murmur
Of underground streams, what I see is a limestone landscape."
W.H. Auden, "In Praise of Limestone"

Utlogget Rolf

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Sv: 'No Place On Earth' is a fascinating tale of survival
« Svar #2 på: 13.12.2013 10:13 »
Mer om filmen:

http://www.magpictures.com/noplaceonearth/
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2343266/

Det finnes mange anmeldelser av filmen på nettet .
Her er litt fra en av dem:

"They were robust people, the Stermers, headed by an indomitable matriarch, Esther. Several dozen people, including one as young as 2, survived for more than 500 days in two different caves. The first cave turned out to be unsafe, as it became a refuge for Gentile peasants who were fleeing Nazi conscription. But they found a second cave and, aided by family members who were able to live above ground thanks to well-placed bribes, this family lived in near-constant darkness, with temperatures in the mid-50s and 90 percent humidity. They didn't all make it, and the film effectively depicts their insecurity, as well as their vulnerability to hunger and thirst, to treacherous neighbors, to boredom."

http://www.indyweek.com/indyweek/surviving-the-holocaust-underground-in-no-place-on-earth/Content?oid=3681580
"When I try to imagine a faultless love
Or the life to come, what I hear is the murmur
Of underground streams, what I see is a limestone landscape."
W.H. Auden, "In Praise of Limestone"

Utlogget Rolf

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Sv: 'No Place On Earth' is a fascinating tale of survival
« Svar #3 på: 29.04.2014 15:27 »
"At one point in the documentary “No Place on Earth,” Saul Stermer, now 93, who, with his family, spent 511 days hiding in two Ukrainian caves and escaped the Holocaust, smiles and says, “What a mother!” No wonder. His mother, Esther Stermer, who was 75 years old in 1942 when the Nazis came to her Ukrainian village, saved her family.

During my training to be an oral historian for Steven Spielberg’s survivors of the Shoah visual history project, interviewing Holocaust survivors, I learned that it was often the woman of the family, the mother, the wife, who recognized the Nazi peril before the husband did. Too often the men dismissed signs of impending disaster, shrugged them off with the confidence that they had lived in these homes for years like their parents before them, that they had successful businesses, lovely homes, good neighbors, that this unpleasantness would pass. But somehow the mothers knew. And the families who listened to their women and left Germany or Austria or Czechoslovakia or other countries invaded by the Nazis managed to survive.

Esther was one of these women who knew danger and who dealt with it. She warned the men in her family not to register to work for the Nazis because she realized that those Jewish men who did register were never seen again. She also told her family not to obey orders to move to the ghetto, but to hide instead."

More:

http://blogs.forward.com/sisterhood-blog/197259/the-women-who-warned-their-families/?
"When I try to imagine a faultless love
Or the life to come, what I hear is the murmur
Of underground streams, what I see is a limestone landscape."
W.H. Auden, "In Praise of Limestone"

Utlogget Rolf

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Sv: 'No Place On Earth' is a fascinating tale of survival
« Svar #4 på: 28.07.2017 17:04 »
"When Nazi forces advanced towards the Ukrainian village of Korolówka in 1943, Etcia Goldberg was 36 years old, a widowe
of three children. As the armies drew closer, Etcia took matters into her own hands, leading a group of 37 Jews to a small cave known as Priest’s Grotto.

There, they hid underground, living by candlelight and surviving off scavenged food, for nearly a year before they emerged.

The story the Ukranian Jews who survived the war in a cave is well-documented. Now, a new book is revealing Goldberg’s role for the first time.

344 Days Underground is the self-published novelization of Etcia’s life and her time in the cave, written by her grandson, Valeriy Gritsiv, a former endocrinologist and adoption coordinator. An independent spelunker named Christos Nicola had previously spent years researching Priest’s Grotto, culminating in a National Geographic article, a book, and a documentary on the subject. However, Gritsiv felt that his grandmother never got the credit she deserved. 344 Days Underground is his first book. Gritsiv, whose native language is Ukrainian, worked with a ghost writer to bring her story to light."

Read more:

http://forward.com/news/world/377706/the-brave-jewish-woman-who-helped-37-souls-survive-the-holocaust-in-a-cave/
"When I try to imagine a faultless love
Or the life to come, what I hear is the murmur
Of underground streams, what I see is a limestone landscape."
W.H. Auden, "In Praise of Limestone"